Csepel Művek – Csepel Works

Csepel Művek or Csepel Works is a project of our Hungarian partner KÉK. It is based on a series of workshops and presentations that explore and discuss the possibilities of common development strategies for the hundreds of companies and businesses that formed during and after the privatization process of the Csepel Works plant since the 1990s

Csepel, Budapest aerial view (c) Wikipedia

While in the past, the plant used to be the single largest industrial complex in Hungary, nowadays the territory is owned and occupied by roughly 500-600 companies of various scale and specialization, yet without a shared vision for the future development of the area. The primary goal of the project is to explore models based on which a common place-making and branding strategy could be formulated that, building on the legacy of the Csepel Works, encourages sustainable, mutually reinforcing and innovative practices for the development of local businesses. As part of the project, we are re-examining the cultural and architectural heritage of the Csepel Works plant from the perspectives of economic and urban development and heritage protection. Our findings will be exhibited in the first half of 2018.

About Csepel

Csepel is located at the northern end of Csepel Island in the Danube, and covers one tenth of the island’s area. Being on an island, it is the only complete district of Budapest which is neither in Pest nor in Buda. It has approximately 85,000 inhabitants. Csepel is most easily accessed from central Budapest by the Csepel HÉV. Bridges connect Csepel to southern parts of Pest, Ferencváros and Pesterzsébet, and a ferry links Csepel to Soroksár.

History of Csepel

The original village was located in the present-day freeport (Szabadkikötő) area but it was totally destroyed by the great flood of 1838. The new village was built on higher ground, in present-day Ófalu (Old Village). The town had a population of 9462 according to the 1910 census (the ethnic composition was 84% Hungarian and 18% German[clarification needed]). Formerly it was a working-class borough with several factories; there was even a bicycle named Csepel. During the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 in Budapest, Hungarian fighters made their last stand in Csepel. Today, Csepel contains housing estates as well as middle-class garden suburbs. The district is home to the sports club Csepel SC.

Find more about the history of Csepel Works

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